PAINTING TO PROTECT


Thanks to the support of my collectors, I have committed to giving back 5% of my proceeds each quarter to Great Lakes protection efforts through the nonprofit organization FLOW. Along with quarterly donations, I have made it part of my mission to run my business in the most ethical and sustainable way possible. I am not perfect in these efforts, but I am constantly working to educate myself and I work with like minded individuals and businesses whenever possible. Please continue reading to learn more about how and why I am focusing my energy in this direction.

Painting to Protect the Great Lakes  - Katherine Corden Art

GIVING BACK & SUSTAINABILITY

5% of Katherine Corden Art’s proceeds are given back to help maintain and improve the health of our beloved great lakes.

Reflecting on my work, and my life, I see a lot of the Lake. Whether that is directly in the subject matter, or simply in the color palette and organic marks, She seems to always shine through. I’ve often felt I owe the Lakes for their endless artistic inspiration. I owe them for their overall respite and solace they’ve provided all my life. I want to practice and own my personal stewardship of the land and water that I love, so that the generations that follow can know Her as we have.

When shipping and packaging my paintings and products, I take great care to only source materials from eco-conscious companies. All of my packaging has either been recycled, or is recyclable. I try my best to include a reminder of that in your package.

WHY GREAT LAKES PROTECTION MATTERS

The mitten has 3,288 miles of shoreline. Within the U.S., that’s second only to Alaska.

Our state is home to more than 11,000 inland lakes. That means anytime you’re in need of a swim, wherever you may be, you’re never beyond a six-mile stroll with a furry friend.

And most amazingly, we have more than 20% of the worlds accessible fresh water at our feet. That fact alone deserves a humbling sense of appreciation. 20. Percent.

// Sam Corden from his essay “Welcome to the Lake Lovers”

CURRENT ISSUES

1. THE LINE 5 OIL PIPELINE

“Built in 1953, Line 5 runs from Superior, WI, across the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, directly through the Straits of Mackinac, and down to Sarnia, MI. The pipeline is made up of two 20" pipes that carry nearly 23 million gallons of oil and natural gas liquids daily. Line 5 has failed 29 times since 1968, spilling at least 1.13 million gallons of oil. These 65-year-old pipelines run at depths between 100 and 270 feet in the Straits, directly exposed to the water. Built and operated by Canadian company, Enbridge Inc., less than 10% of the the oil Line 5 is used in Michigan. Line 5 threatens the drinking water supply for 5 million Michigan residents and the Pure Michigan economy…” “An oil spill could pollute up to 720 miles of shoreline along Lake Michigan and Lake Huron.”

2. BIOLOGICAL POLLUTION

“The Clean Water Act [of 1972] took steps in battling industrial pollution. But it failed to deal with biological pollution, which today is causing damage at an alarming speed. Invasive species like sea lamprey and zebra mussels have destroyed ecosystems and set the stage for new disasters, like the toxic algae bloom that cut off Toledo, Ohio's drinking water in 2014.

3. NESTLE BOTTLED WATER

“Each day, 4.8 million bottles of water leave Nestlé’s packaging plant in Stanwood, Michigan and  end up neatly stacked one-by-one in gas station coolers across the Midwest. If you’ve sipped from an Ice Mountain-branded bottle in the last decade, you’ve sampled a tiny fraction of the 3.4 billion gallons that’s been pumped from nine wells in Mecosta and Osceola Counties.”

4. KEEPING INVASIVE SPECIES OUT OF THE GREAT LAKES.

“Once invasive species are established in the Great Lakes, it is nearly impossible to remove them. Preventing them from ever entering is the best way to protect the Great Lakes.”

5. GREAT LAKES PLASTIC POLLUTION

“As plastic pollution breaks down in the Great Lakes, microscopic pieces of plastic are found in the lakes and even treated drinking water.”

6. WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN GETS PERMISSION TO DRAW WATER FROM LAKE MICHIGAN.

“The controversial decision to allow Waukesha, Wis., access to Lake Michigan water marks the first test case of the Great Lakes Compact, an agreement ratified by the lake states in 2008 to protect the Great Lakes from large-scale water diversions out of the Great Lakes basin.” Additional information also found at freshwaterfuture.org.

FLOW: For Love of Water

FLOW is a non-profit organization that serves to speak for and protect our fresh water and the health of the Great Lakes – the basins for 20% of the world’s fresh water.

I was introduced to FLOW at my very first public art showing and since then have really valued my growing friendship with Liz Kirkwood and her team. I am not an expert on the environment, but I deeply care about it, and I trust FLOW to carry out their mission with our support.

JOURNAL ENTRIES

The Lake Lovers Collection is about the relationship between us and the Great Lakes. A mixture of acrylic, gouache, neo-crayon and graphite contribute to an impressionist style and are a reminder that like us, the lakes are not perfect. 5% of the proceeds from this series will go towards Great Lakes protection efforts. Produced by Meredith Johnson